International Law

Viet D. Dinh, Dunwody Distinguished Lecture in Law: Nationalism in the Age of Terror

56 Fla. L. Rev. 867 (2004) | | | | INTRODUCTION :: September 11, 2001 was a wake up call. Many of us, however, are still asking ourselves exactly what we woke up to and how it should define our domestic and foreign policy. Appreciating the exceptional nature of the threat, the government has embarked […]

Maxwell O. Chibundu, For God, for Country, for Universalism: Sovereignty as Solidarity in our Age of Terror

56 Fla. L. Rev. 883 (2004) | | | | INTRODUCTION :: “Nations and peoples can lose their heads.” On September 11, 2001, three hijacked jet airliners deliberately were crashed into buildings in New York City and Washington, D.C. A fourth aircraft, apparently intended for the same purpose, crashed into a field in Pennsylvania. The […]

Amitai Etzioni, On the Need for more Transnational Capacity

56 Fla. L. Rev. 921 (2004) | | | | INTRODUCTION :: Professor Dinh raises the right issue highlighted by the 9/11 Commission: what should be the post-Cold War organizing principle for the global order? Historians may well consider the period between 1989 and 2001 a confused interim, in which it was unclear what would […]

Winston P. Nagan & Craig Hammer, Patriotism, Nationalism, and the War on Terror: A Mild Plea in Avoidance

56 Fla. L. Rev. 933 (2004) | | | | INTRODUCTION :: “Terrorism is a global menace which clearly calls for global action. Individual actions by Member States, whether aimed at State or non-state actors, cannot in themselves provide a solution. We must meet this threat together.” -Kofi Annan “Major Strasser has been shot. Round […]

Jordan J. Paust, Tolerance in the Age of Increased Interdependence

56 Fla. L. Rev. 987 (2004) | | | | INTRODUCTION :: For several reasons, I hope that you will be a relatively tolerant reader. I am not sure that I can offer insights that an experienced psychiatrist or sensitive moral philosopher might lend to a discussion of love, loyalty, nationalism, patriotism, and what most […]

John Quigley, Identifying the Origins of Anti-American Terrorism

56 Fla. L. Rev. 1003 (2004) | | | | INTRODUCTION :: Professor Dinh’s analysis is directed at identifying the instrumentalities that, in his view, should cope with terrorism. His analysis is an important piece of the puzzle. Professor Dinh argues that it is nation-states, acting collectively, that should respond to terrorism, and his article […]