Intellectual Property

Irina D. Manta, The High Cost of Low Sanctions

Low sanctions can initially appear to be a mitigating factor for unjust or inefficient laws, but this perception is likely wrong. This Article argues that low sanctions may have a pernicious effect on the democratic process and on legislative rule making because, as both public choice theory and historical precedent suggest, the laws accompanying these […]

Adam Mossoff, The Trespass Fallacy in Patent Law

The patent system is broken and in dire need of reform; so says the popular press, scholars, lawyers, judges, congresspersons, and even the President. One common complaint is that patents are now failing as property rights because their boundaries are not as clear as the fences that demarcate real estate—patent infringement is neither as determinate nor as efficient as trespass […]

The Quantification of the Productive Inefficiencies of Patent Production

Xavier Seuba

Abstract Response to William Hubbard, The Debilitating Effect of Exclusive Rights: Patents and Productive Inefficiency Professor William Hubbard’s article, The Debilitating Effect of Exclusive Rights: Patents and Productive Inefficiency, starts by asking, “Are we underestimating the costs of patent protection?” One reaction to that initial question might be excitement that some researcher has calculated the costs and benefits […]

Marc Edelman, Closing the “Free Speech” Loophole: the Case for Protecting College Athletes’ Publicity Rights in Commercial Video Games

When Electronic Arts Inc. (Electronic Arts) launched its video game series NCAA Football in June 1993, the available technology limited developers to crafting avatars that looked like faceless figurines. Today, however, advancements in digital technology have enabled developers to create “virtual players” that strongly resemble their reallife counterparts. For example, in NCAA Football 12, the […]

William Hubbard, Competitive Patent Law

Can U.S. patent law help American businesses compete in global markets? In early 2011, President Barack Obama argued that, to obtain economic prosperity, the United States must “out-innovate . . . the rest of the world,”1 and that patent reform is a “critical dimension[]”2 of this innovation agenda. Soon thereafter, Congress enacted the most sweeping […]

Michael Risch, America's First Patents

Courts and commentators vigorously debate early American patent history because of a spotty documentary record. To fill these gaps, scholars have examined the adoption of the Intellectual Property Clause of the Constitution, correspondence, dictionaries, and British and colonial case law. But there is one largely ignored body of information—the content of early patents themselves. While […]