Florida Law Review Forum

Wrongful Removals

Lonny Hoffman and Erin Horan Mendez

Response to Joan Steinman, Waiving Removal, Waiving Remand—The Hidden and Unequal Dangers of Participating in Litigation Abstract Professor Steinman’s treatment of the disparities in removal and remand law is sobering and deserves careful consideration by law makers. We want to add our voice to her analysis by adding some additional context and perspective on some […]

Requiem for a Heavyweight: The Decline and Fall of Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council

Daniel Farber

Abstract Response to Michael C. Blumm & Rachel G. Wolfard, Revisiting Background Principles in Takings Litigation Part I of this comment reviews Lucas and its use of the concept of background principles as an exception to takings liability. Part II will discuss Professor Blumm and Ms. Wolfard’s important contribution to our understanding of the Lucas […]

Stone Monuments and Flexible Laws: Removing Confederate Monuments Through Historic Preservation Laws

Peter Byrne

Abstract Response to Jess R. Phelps & Jessica Owley, Etched in Stone: Historic Preservation Law and Confederate Monuments Jess Phelps and Jessica Owley present an informative and useful account of how historic preservation laws might complicate or prevent efforts to remove Confederate monuments. Many lawyers and activists will be grateful for this guidance. However, Phelps […]

‘Nothing Compares 2 U:’ A Response to Beyond Compare: A Codefendant’s Prison Sentence as a Mitigating Factor in Death Penalty Cases

John H. Blume & Megan E. Barnes

Abstract Response to Jeffrey Kirchmeier, Beyond Compare: A Codefendant’s Prison Sentence as a Mitigating Factor in Death Penalty Cases The argument that the Court’s desire to eliminate arbitrariness in capital sentencing should allow juries to consider co-defendant sentences applies with equal force to juveniles sentenced to life without parole—to whom the Court has applied similar […]

Magistrate Judge Matthewman’s New E-Discovery Paradigm and Solving the E-Discovery Paradox

William F. Hamilton

Abstract Response to William Matthewman, Towards a New Paradigm for E-Discovery in Civil Litigation: A Judicial Perspective We are gradually leaving a quasi-dystopian era of “no-holds-barred” discovery slugfests featuring overreaching, recalcitrance, posturing, and exaggeration. On the future’s horizon, advance parties have made fitful, hesitant, and, at times, successful forays into the rich terrain of electronically […]

A View From the Bench and the Trench(es) in Response to Judge Matthewman’s New Paradigm for EDiscovery: It’s More Complicated

Andrew Jay Peck

Abstract Response to William Matthewman, Towards a New Paradigm for E-Discovery in Civil Litigation: A Judicial Perspective We need more judges like my friend Judge William “Bill” Matthewman, who are willing to reflect on eDiscovery, not as a nuisance to be avoided, but in a thoughtful manner to advance the aims of Rule 1, for […]