Florida Law Review Forum

Examining the Committee on Infractions’s Affirmation Rate of NCAA Enforcement Staff Allegations of Rules Violations

Josh Lens

Abstract The NCAA, the national governing body for college athletics, is in a precarious position. Battered by recent lawsuits, the NCAA is undergoing a self-initiated review designed to modernize and transform its operations through updating its constitution and rules.The enforcement process through which the NCAA enforces its myriad regulations has proven central to this review […]

“Shall Not Be Construed”: Reversal of Supreme Court Decisions by Constitutional Amendment

John v. Orth

Abstract This Article considers the way in which small changes of wording can signal large changes of thought in the United States Constitution (Constitution). Drawing upon examples found in the Eleventh and Sixteenth Amendments, and in the Reconstruction Amendments, the Article shows that there are two ways to reverse a U.S. Supreme Court decision by […]

Smart Meters as a Catalyst for Privacy Law

Matthew Tokson

Abstract Response to Matthew B. Kugler & Meredith Hurley, Protecting Energy Privacy Across the Public/Private Divide Smart utility meters raise several puzzling legal questions and answering them can help point the way toward the future of Fourth Amendment and civil privacy law. More than any other current technology, smart meters compel the development of use […]

DOJ’s Failure to Prove Its “Killer Acquisition” Claim In Sabre/ Farelogix and Parallels to Other Recent Government Merger Litigation Losses

Steven C. Sunshine and Julia K. York

Abstract On August 20, 2019, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) sued to block Sabre Corporation (Sabre), a provider of a global distribution system (GDS) to travel agents, from acquiring Farelogix, Inc. (Farelogix), an IT provider to airlines. DOJ advocated a killer acquisition theory, portraying Sabre as a dominant firm intent on “tak[ing] out” Farelogix, […]

The Freedmen’s Memorial to Lincoln: A Postscript to Stone Monuments and Flexible Laws

Peter Byrne

Abstract In a recent essay in the Florida Law Review Forum, commenting on a recent article by Jess Phelps and Jessica Owley, I argued that historic preservation law poses no significant barrier to removal of Confederate monuments and even provides a useful process within which a community can study and debate the fate of specific […]

Activist Judges?: Technology, Rule 1, and the Limits of Judge Matthewman’s New Paradigm for E-Discovery

David Horrigan

Response to William Matthewman, Towards a New Paradigm for E-Discovery in Civil Litigation: A Judicial Perspective Abstract The description, “activist judge,” often has a pejorative connotation in the culture wars, but what about judicial activism advocating for professionalism, cooperation, and honest good faith in e-discovery? Activism has been defined as “a doctrine or practice that […]