Category Archives: Criminal Law

Rebekah R. Runyon, Am I Under Arrest? Why the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines Need A Strict Definition of What Constitutes an Intervening Arrest

Congress provided for the creation of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines to promote fairness and produce proportional and uniform sentences. The Guidelines provide judges with a guideline range for sentencing based on a defendant’s criminal history score and the offense level … Continue reading

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Samuel R. Wiseman,What Is Federal Habeas Worth?

Federal habeas review of state non-capital cases under the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 (AEDPA) is widely regarded as deeply flawed for producing a huge volume of costly litigation and very little relief. Many scholars have called … Continue reading

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Jennifer Lada, Bouncing the Proverbial Blank Check: An Argument for Including Candidates for Public Office Within the Scope of the Hobbs Act

The Hobbs Act, codified at 18 U.S.C. § 1951, criminalizes bribery of and extortion by public officials. Under the statute, “‘extortion’ means the obtaining of property from another, with his consent, induced by wrongful use of actual or threatened force, … Continue reading

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Margaret Tarkington, Lost in the Compromise: Free Speech, Criminal Justice, and Attorney Pretrial Publicity

The right to a jury trial, the presumption of innocence, the social compact between the individual and the State—these are among the weighty interests in our criminal justice system that can be bolstered or undermined through attorney pretrial publicity. The … Continue reading

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Adam M. Hapner, You Have the Right to Remain Silent, But Anything You Don’t Say May Be Used Against You: The Admissibility of Silence as Evidence After Salinas v. Texas

In Salinas v. Texas, the United States Supreme Court held that a suspect’s refusal to answer an officer’s questions during a noncustodial, pre-Miranda, criminal interrogation is admissible at trial as substantive evidence of guilt. In a plurality decision, Justice Samuel … Continue reading

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Marc B. Hernandez, Guilt Without Mens Rea: How Florida’s Elimination of Mens Rea for Drug Possession is Constitutional

The Florida Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act is almost unique among criminal drug statutes in the United States. Like all states, Florida prohibits the possession, sale, and delivery of certain controlled substances. However, a recent revision of the … Continue reading

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