Category Archives: Constitutional Law

Emily S. Bremer, The Unwritten Administrative Constitution

It is widely accepted that the powers of the federal government flow from the U.S. Constitution. Yet in practice, most federal power is exercised through administrative agencies, institutions not mentioned in the Constitution. Since the New Deal Era, administrative law—the … Continue reading

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Peter L. Markowitz & Lindsay C. Nash, Constitutional Venue

A foundational concept of American jurisprudence is the principle that it is unfair to allow litigants to be haled into far away tribunals when the litigants and the litigation have little or nothing to do with the location of such … Continue reading

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Rodney A. Smolla, Regulating the Speech of Judges and Lawyers: The First Amendment and the Soul of the Profession

The legal profession has historically asserted moral and legal authority to substantially control the speech of judges and lawyers. This impulse to control the speech of judges and lawyers is driven by many of the profession’s most strongly held interests … Continue reading

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Anne R. Traum, Using Outcomes to Reframe Guilty Plea Adjudication

The Supreme Court’s 2012 decisions in Lafler v. Cooper and Missouri v. Frye lay the groundwork for a new approach to judicial oversight of guilty pleas that considers outcomes. These cases confirm that courts possess robust authority to protect defendants’ … Continue reading

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Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, Constitutional Culpability: Questioning the New Exclusionary Rules

This Article addresses the questions left unanswered by the Supreme Court’s recent exclusionary rule cases. The Hudson-Herring-Davis trilogy presents a new and largely unexamined doctrinal landscape for Fourth Amendment suppression hearings. Courts, litigators, and scholars are only now assessing what … Continue reading

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Sergio J. Campos, Class Actions and Justiciability

A lingering issue in class action law concerns the case or controversy requirement of Article III, otherwise known as the requirement of justiciability. For purposes of justiciability doctrines such as standing, mootness, and ripeness, is the class action brought by … Continue reading

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