Category Archives: Civil Procedure

Stephen Carr, Reconsidering Indirect-Purchaser Class Actions

Few issues have proven more vexing to private antitrust enforcement than those related to indirect-purchaser class actions. The current dual system of enforcement—federal and state—exacerbates the difficulty of litigating indirect-purchaser claims by layering procedural complexity on top of substantive complexity … Continue reading

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Cole Barnett, Is Injury a Tortious Act?: Interpreting Florida’s Long-Arm Statute

Florida Statute § 48.193 enumerates several acts that grant Florida courts personal jurisdiction over nonresident defendants. Under Florida Statute § 48.193(1)(a)(2), nonresident defendants may become subject to personal jurisdiction in Florida by “committing a tortious act within this state.” The … Continue reading

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Judge Emmett Ripley Cox, Thirty-Two Years on the Federal Bench: Some Things I Have Learned

In this Essay, prepared as the basis for the 2014 Dunwody Distinguished Lecture in Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law, Judge Cox discusses a few things he learned from his experience as a trial judge and later as … Continue reading

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Peter L. Markowitz & Lindsay C. Nash, Constitutional Venue

A foundational concept of American jurisprudence is the principle that it is unfair to allow litigants to be haled into far away tribunals when the litigants and the litigation have little or nothing to do with the location of such … Continue reading

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Stephen E. Ludovici, Rule 60(b)(4): When the Courts of Limited Jurisdiction Yield to Finality

It is basic hornbook law—affirmed by courts across time and space repeatedly and unequivocally—that subject-matter jurisdiction cannot be waived. However, in the context of a Rule 60(b)(4) motion seeking relief from a void final judgment after the time for appeal … Continue reading

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Kevin J. Lynch, The Lock-in Effect of Preliminary Injunctions

One important bias economists and psychologists have identified is the lock-in effect. The lock-in effect causes a decision maker who must revisit an earlier decision to be locked in to that earlier decision. The effect is particularly pronounced where the … Continue reading

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