Author Archives: Rebekah Runyon

Andrew Guthrie Ferguson, Constitutional Culpability: Questioning the New Exclusionary Rules

This Article addresses the questions left unanswered by the Supreme Court’s recent exclusionary rule cases. The Hudson-Herring-Davis trilogy presents a new and largely unexamined doctrinal landscape for Fourth Amendment suppression hearings. Courts, litigators, and scholars are only now assessing what … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional Law, Fourth Amendment | Comments Off

Sergio J. Campos, Class Actions and Justiciability

A lingering issue in class action law concerns the case or controversy requirement of Article III, otherwise known as the requirement of justiciability. For purposes of justiciability doctrines such as standing, mootness, and ripeness, is the class action brought by … Continue reading

Posted in Class Actions, Constitutional Law | Comments Off

Robert D. Sowell, New Decisions Highlight Old Misgivings: A Reassessment of the Foreign Trade Antitrust Improvements Act Following Minn-Chem

What role does the United States play in policing international commerce? At what point do the laws of the United States end and those of other nations begin? These questions, among others, arise in determining when U.S. antitrust laws apply … Continue reading

Posted in Antitrust & Trade Law, International Law | Comments Off

Kathleen Carlson, Social Media and the Workplace: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Privacy Settings and the NLRB

Social media has permeated every aspect of society. The use of social media can easily lead to issues in an employment law context when employees suffer adverse employment actions based on the information they choose to share via their personal … Continue reading

Posted in Employment Law, Fourth Amendment, Internet Law | Comments Off

Ben Trachtenberg, Testimonial Is As Testimonial Does

In the decade since Crawford v. Washington declared “testimony” to be the touchstone of the Confrontation Clause, courts—from the humblest criminal trial court to the Supreme Court itself—have struggled with two problems. First, defining “testimonial” has proven difficult. Second, in … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional Law, Evidence | Comments Off

Richard D. Friedman, The Mold That Shapes Hearsay Law

In response to an article previously published in the Florida Law Review by Professor Ben Trachtenberg, Professor Friedman argues that the historical thesis of Crawford v. Washington is basically correct: The Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment reflects a principle about how … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional Law, Evidence | Comments Off